Best of British Cheese– PIGLET US
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Best of British Cheese

Is Christmas without having a cheese platter constantly on the go even Christmas?!

As you may be able to tell, cheese has always been one of my favourite Christmas indulgences. Great for sharing during a Christmas movie, easy to whip out when faced with unexpected guests and a perfect addition to the year's main meal, there is nothing bad to say about a well put together cheese board. The hard part is choosing which cheeses to go for. With so many options out there, we decided to go fully British this year and truly showcase the beautiful dairy products of the UK.

Each one of the cheeses is sourced directly from local producers. "For me, what makes British cheese production so amazing are the cheesemakers. They are such resilient, kind and passionate people", says Lucie Nock from The Cheese Society. "There is a lot of deep rooted knowledge and experience amongst UK cheesemongers which is testament to the incredible cheeses that are created in this country." 

So with the incredible help of Lucie, here are some great suggestions for creating the ultimate British cheese board with these incredible homegrown cheeses.

 

BARON BIGOD

Unpasteurised cows milk from Bungay, Suffolk, England

This delicious round cheese is made in a style similar to a top end Brie de Meaux. The protein rich milk of the Montbeliarde cows provides the cheese with a beautiful milky flavour that blends with an earthy richness.

 

MRS TEMPLES BINHAM BLUE

Pasteurised cows milk from Norfolk, England. Vegetarian.

We love all things Norfolk here at Piglet, so it is no surprise that this creamy cheesy with a lovely tangy flavour is a firm favourite. And who can blame us? This blue is hand made on the Holkham Estate by Catherine Temple with milk from her herd of Brown Swiss which graze near Wells-next-the-Sea. You don't get a much more comprehensive provenance than that!

 

LINDUM

Unpasteurised cows milk from Lincolnshire, England.

This exquisite smooth cheesy with a moreish earthy flavour is named after the Roman for Lincoln. It has a slightly pink coloured rind which is developed thanks to being washed in 'Bomber County Beer', a popular local ale from Tom Woods. This is one of my absolute favourites.

 

GORWYDD CAERPHILLY

Unpasteurised cows milk from Wales.

The Cheese Society champion the Trethowan Brothers caerphilly which is truly one the yummiest I've ever tried as they make a point of working the cheese curds by hand which gives this naturally rinded cheese a lovely deep flavour and great texture which showcases the traditional clean, almost citrusy taste of a caerphilly.

 

TICKLEMORE

Pasteurised goats milk from Devon, England.

This goats cheese doesn't actually taste remotely goaty (which is so often my husband's bugbear with goats milk cheeses). It is pressed into a basket mould and left to mature over 2 to 3 month, developing a great tasty rind. It has a lovely full flavour, with hints of lemony freshness.

 

EXTRA MATURE CORNISH GOUDA

Pasteurised cows milk from Newton St Cyres, England.

This is a traditional gouda cheese but with a smoky twist. Made by the Cornish Gouda Company that moved over to the West Country from the Netherlands this is a great strong flavoured addition to any discerning cheese board.

 

Some Extra Tips On Serving Your Cheese 

The Cheese Society suggest taking your cheese out of the fridge a good 30 minutes before tucking in and serving after a meal but before desert, with a good glug of wine still in your glass.Try to use separate knives to avoid cross-contaminating the flavours and if you intend the taste the lot (err... who wouldn't be?), begin with the mildest finishing with the strongest blues to be able to better to appreciate all the individual flavours.

And if you need some inspiration and how to present a cornucopia like cheese platter, check out this handy post on creating the ultimate one.

Can't wait to tuck in!

 

 

 


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